Don’t Tell. . . Show

Posted on Updated on

Where I’m at Wednesday January 15, 2014

OK…lots of juggling going on. So, I finished chapters 17 & 18, but they needed to be broken into two chapters each. Technically, I am writing chapters 18 and 20 now. Another change is that I am no longer going to Copenhagen. After researching, my characters will charter an aircraft from Reykjavik, Iceland to London, England.

I don’t regret the work it took to research Copenhagen. I may utilize it in the future either for this series, or another book.

This is a minor change on what may be the finalized product. I try not to get too attached to the direction—it’s part of being a writer. I know the key points, where my characters are going, and how it’ll all end. I like to create some realism along the way. Going to Copenhagen was an unrealistic journey, which would have caused my characters to double-back.

Thank you for the likes and/or follows. Feel free to comment, ask questions, or tell me about your projects.

See you next week,

Take care.

*Stormy weather on a city street

*

Have you ever heard the statement: “Don’t tell—show”?

It means that even though it is easier, (and can become habitual) telling a story over the details is not interesting. Don’t flatten your story by indulging us with the ability to read it, but cause our other humanely-senses to tingle.

Life is meant to drink!

I like to envision what our hero/heroin feels, smells, sees, and hears. I’m not saying that you need to gush with endless descriptions. But be more concise with your choice of words.

Sometimes, you don’t need to elaborate actions with words. Dig deeper…pause…and create a scene in your head. Tell us what you see, and then reword it to sound stronger.

For example:

                                          “He ran in from outside.”

                         “Winded, he burst through the front door.”

 

You get the idea that he ran by suggesting words “winded” and “burst”. Plus, it is more powerful and suggests urgency. If you took each sentence in your story as seriously—by the end—it’ll be magnificent!

Good luck my friends.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s